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New Zealand's Foreign Policy under the Jacinda Ardern Government cover

The purpose of this book is to examine the foreign policy of Jacinda Ardern's New Zealand Government between 2020 and early 2023 when the COVID-19 pandemic intersected with an evolving and often tumultuous post-Cold War global environment. This context witnessed the erosion of an international rules-based order and the renewal of great power competition. In particular, the Indo-Pacific has become a contested strategic space, which impacted on New Zealand's foreign policy interests.

As a self-proclaimed small state, New Zealand faced distinct challenges: the Ardern Government formulated a distinctive foreign policy that drew on the success of its handling of the pandemic as well as Aotearoa New Zealand's indigenous values, and emphasised the importance of a good international reputation, strong diplomatic networks, and multilateral cooperation to maintain and grow its influence.

This interdisciplinary volume brings together academics, policymakers and practitioners and provides essential reading for anyone interested in how relatively small states such as New Zealand can navigate significant foreign policy challenges in an increasingly complex and contested system of international relations.

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Sample Chapter(s)
Introduction
Chapter 1: Foreign Policy of Jacinda Ardern’s Government in the Era of COVID-19: Minister Mahuta’s Vision for Aotearoa New Zealand’s Foreign Policy

Contents:

  • Dedication
  • Foreword
  • About the Editors
  • About the Contributors
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Setting the Scene: The Ardern Government's Foreign Policy Agenda:
    • Foreign Policy of Jacinda Ardern's Government in the Era of COVID-19: Minister Mahuta's Vision for Aotearoa New Zealand's Foreign Policy (Nanaia Mahuta)
  • The Geopolitical and Economic Context of COVID-19:
    • New Zealand and the Indo-Pacific: Adaptation to Changing Geopolitics (Clifford A Hart, Jr)
    • The Taniwha and the Dragon: New Zealand's Relationship with China under the Ardern Government at a Time of Growing Geopolitical Uncertainty (Nicholas Ross Smith)
    • Trade Policy under the Ardern Government (Robert Scollay)
  • The Promise and Possibilities of Ardern's COVID-19 Pandemic Stance:
    • The New Zealand Public Health Response to COVID-19 and International Implications for Managing Future Pandemic Threats (Philip C Hill)
    • Climate Considerations (Alice C Hill)
    • Climate Policy in Jacinda Ardern's New Zealand: A Ngāi Tahu Perspective (Lisa Tumahai)
    • Big Global Issues and Soft Power: New Zealand and the Pacific (Marion Crawshaw)
  • Security and Foreign Policy Directions for New Zealand during the COVID-19 Era:
    • National Security, COVID-19 and New Zealand Foreign Policy (Bethan Greener)
    • The Ardern Government's Independent Foreign Policy at a Time of Great Power Competition and Australia–China Tensions (Reuben Steff)
    • New Zealand's Asia Story: The Curious Case of New Zealand–India Relations (Suzannah Jessep)
  • Conclusion: Implications for the Foreign Policy of Ardern's Government:
    • The Era of COVID-19 and Beyond: Some Reflections on the Implications for the Foreign Policy of Jacinda Ardern's Government (Geoffrey Miller)
  • Index

Readership: Advanced undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of New Zealand Foreign Policy, International Relations, and Geopolitics.

Free Access
FRONT MATTER
  • Pages:i–xl

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_fmatter

Part I Setting the Scene: The Ardern Government’s Foreign Policy Agenda


Free Access
Chapter 1: Foreign Policy of Jacinda Ardern’s Government in the Era of COVID-19: Minister Mahuta’s Vision for Aotearoa New Zealand’s Foreign Policy
  • Pages:3–20

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0001

Part II The Geopolitical and Economic Context of COVID-19


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Chapter 2: New Zealand and the Indo-Pacific: Adaptation to Changing Geopolitics
  • Pages:23–41

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0002

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Chapter 3: The Taniwha and the Dragon: New Zealand’s Relationship with China under the Ardern Government at a Time of Growing Geopolitical Uncertainty
  • Pages:43–62

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0003

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Chapter 4: Trade Policy under the Ardern Government
  • Pages:63–95

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0004

Part III The Promise and Possibilities of Ardern’s COVID-19 Pandemic Stance


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Chapter 5: The New Zealand Public Health Response to COVID-19 and International Implications for Managing Future Pandemic Threats
  • Pages:99–129

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0005

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Chapter 6: Climate Considerations
  • Pages:131–138

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0006

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Chapter 7: Climate Policy in Jacinda Ardern’s New Zealand: A Ngāi Tahu Perspective
  • Pages:139–157

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0007

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Chapter 8: Big Global Issues and Soft Power: New Zealand and the Pacific
  • Pages:159–170

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0008

Part IV Security and Foreign Policy Directions for New Zealand during the COVID-19 Era


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Chapter 9: National Security, COVID-19 and New Zealand Foreign Policy
  • Pages:173–190

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0009

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Chapter 10: The Ardern Government’s Independent Foreign Policy at a Time of Great Power Competition and Australia–China Tensions
  • Pages:191–219

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0010

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Chapter 11: New Zealand’s Asia Story: The Curious Case of New Zealand–India Relations
  • Pages:221–242

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0011

Part V Conclusion: Implications for the Foreign Policy of Ardern’s Government


No Access
Chapter 12: The Era of COVID-19 and Beyond: Some Reflections on the Implications for the Foreign Policy of Jacinda Ardern’s Government
  • Pages:245–263

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811285165_0012

Robert G Patman is one of the University of Otago's Inaugural Sesquicentennial Distinguished Chairs and a specialist in international relations in the Politics Programme. He is the Director of the Master of International Studies (MIntSt) programme. He has authored or edited 13 books with most recent being a co-edited volume titled From Asia-Pacific to Indo-Pacific: Diplomacy in a Contested Region (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021). Robert is also an Honorary Professor of the New Zealand Defence Command and Staff College and makes regular contributions to the national as well as global media on international issues.

 

Peter Grace is a Teaching Fellow in the Politics Programme at the University of Otago, New Zealand. He is co-director of the annual Otago National Security School. His forthcoming book is The Intel Intellectuals: How Social Scientists Helped Create the Central Intelligence Agency, 1950–1953. Peter's research interests include intelligence history, international relations theory, and public preparedness for national crises.

 

Balazs Kiglics is a Teaching Fellow in the Languages and Cultures Programme at the University of Otago, New Zealand. His doctoral thesis explored the role of values in Japanese elite perceptions of contemporary Japan–China relations. He also coordinates the annual Otago Foreign Policy School and Otago National Security School. Balazs has co-edited the volumes New Zealand and the World: Past, Present and Future and From Asia-Pacific to Indo-Pacific: Diplomacy in a Contested Region. His research interests include Japanese and Chinese studies, international relations of the Indo-Pacific, and intercultural communication.

 

Dennis Wesselbaum is an Associate Professor in Economics at the University of Otago, the President of the New Zealand Association of Economists, Editor-in-Chief of New Zealand Economic Papers, and Associate Editor of Humanities & Social Sciences Communications. He earned a Diploma in (Theoretical) Economics from the University of Kiel and received his Doctorate (Doctor rerum politicarum) from the University of Hamburg. In between, he worked as a researcher for the Kiel Institute for the World Economy. Dennis is a theoretical macroeconomist by training but has both theoretical and empirical interests across various fields. His research activity is split between macroeconomic topics and the interaction between climate, environment and society. His research is interdisciplinary in nature and covers macroeconomics (especially monetary and fiscal policy), economic development, labour, health and environmental impacts.