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Materials science institutions have always been crucial to the development of materials research. Even before materials science emerged as a discipline in the 20th century, these institutions existed in various forms. They provided specialized facilities for research, educated new generations of researchers, drafted policies and funded programs, enabled valuable connections between research groups, or played any other role which were needed to further the progress of materials science.

This volume, the third in a series of volumes covering the development and history of materials science, presents illuminating perspectives on material science institutions. Twenty chapters are organized into six comprehensive parts of which each cover a characteristic aspect or historical feature. True to the topic they write about, the contributors to this volume have varied backgrounds. Some are materials scientists and engineers, but others are historians, philosophers of science, sociologists, or even directors of institutions themselves. This comprehensive, unified collection is a valuable resource for undergraduates, graduate students, academics, policymakers and professionals who are actively interested in materials science and its development from the past to the future.

Part of A World Scientific Encyclopedia of the Development and History of Materials Science

Related Link(s)

Sample Chapter(s)
Introduction: Materials Science Institutions
Chapter 1.1: Institutions and Technology in Materials Research

Contents:

  • About the Contributors
  • Introduction: Materials Science Institutions (Robert P Crease)
  • Historical Evolution and Disciplinary Formation:
    • Institutions and Technology in Materials Research (Thomas Kaiserfeld)
    • From Materials Research to Materials Science: Disciplinary and Institutional Developments (Klaus Hentschel)
    • Institutional Development of the Organizational Field of Synchrotron Radiation Facilities in Europe (Olof Hallonsten and Thomas Heinze)
  • How Sources Evolve: Neutron Synchrotron, and Spallation:
    • Three Generations of Institutions of Neutron Sources (Thomas Kaiserfeld)
    • Interplay of Actors and Institutions in the Campaign to Localize ESS to Lund (Olof Hallonsten)
    • Brief History of Synchrotron Radiation Sources in Brazil (Liu Lin)
  • How Laboratories Evolve: Industrial, National, and Individual:
    • The Age of Industrial Laboratories (Joseph D Martin)
    • The Age of the National Laboratories: The Advent of the New Big Science (Catherine Westfall)
    • Becoming Materials Science? Turning Points in the History of Materials Science at the ESRF, 1994–2020 (Katharina C Cramer)
  • University Centers, Professional Societies, Publications, and Conferences:
    • Government Funding of University Materials Science and Engineering Research Centers (Brit Shields)
    • History and Sociology of MSE Professional Societies and Associations (Linn W Hobbs)
    • Materials Science Journals and Journals That Publish Materials Science (Daniel Ucko)
    • History of the Brazilian MRS Meetings (Guillermo Solòrzano)
  • Regional Networks:
    • Building the Blocks of Sciences for Materials: Materials Science Institutions in Japan from a Historical Perspective (Hiroto Kono)
    • The Rise of Materials Science in China: Historical Aspects of Educational and Research Institutions (Wei Qian)
    • The Development of Materials Research Institutions in Africa (Wole Soboyejo, Samuel Chigome and Iwnetim Abate)
    • The Roots of Materials Science in Argentina: Jorge A Sabato's Multifaceted Metallurgy Project (Armando Fernández Guillermet)
  • Institutions of Institutions:
    • The Origin and Early Days of Material Research in Metrology Laboratories (Terry Quinn)
    • CERN: A Global Hub for Materials Science (Panagiotis Charitos, Paul Lecoq, Michael Moll, Cristoforo Benvenuti and Luca Bottura)
    • Will Small Be Beautiful? Making Policies for Our Nanotech Future (W Patrick McCray)
  • Index

Readership: Students in Materials Science, chemistry, history, philosophy of science. Materials scientists, chemical engineers, chemists, cultural history, global history, policy planners, regulators, political scientists.

Free Access
FRONT MATTER
  • Pages:i–xxi

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_fmatter

Part I Historical Evolution and Disciplinary Formation


Free Access
Part I: Historical Evolution and Disciplinary Formation
  • Pages:1–3

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others01

Free Access
Chapter 1.1: Institutions and Technology in Materials Research
  • Pages:5–12

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0001

No Access
Chapter 1.2: From Materials Research to Materials Science: Disciplinary and Institutional Developments
  • Pages:13–65

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0002

Part II How Sources Evolve: Neutron, Synchrotron, and Spallation


Free Access
Part II: How Sources Evolve: Neutron, Synchrotron, and Spallation
  • Pages:81–82

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others02

No Access
Chapter 2.1: Three Generations of Institutions of Neutron Sources
  • Pages:83–113

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0004

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Chapter 2.2: Interplay of Actors and Institutions in the Campaign to Localize ESS to Lund
  • Pages:115–135

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0005

No Access
Chapter 2.3: Brief History of Synchrotron Radiation Sources in Brazil
  • Pages:137–148

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0006

Part III How Laboratories Evolve: Industrial, National, and Individual


Free Access
Part III: How Laboratories Evolve: Industrial, National, and Individual
  • Pages:149–151

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others03

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Chapter 3.1: The Age of Industrial Laboratories
  • Pages:153–171

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0007

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Chapter 3.2: The Age of the National Laboratories: The Advent of the New Big Science
  • Pages:173–186

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0008

No Access
Chapter 3.3: Becoming Materials Science? Turning Points in the History of Materials Science at the ESRF, 1994–2020
  • Pages:187–207

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0009

Part IV University Centers, Professional Societies, Publications, and Conferences


Free Access
Part IV: University Centers, Professional Societies, Publications, and Conferences
  • Pages:209–211

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others04

No Access
Chapter 4.1: Government Funding of University Materials Science and Engineering Research Centers
  • Pages:213–225

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0010

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Chapter 4.2: History and Sociology of Materials Science & Engineering Professional Societies and Associations
  • Pages:227–400

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0011

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Chapter 4.3: Materials Science Journals and Journals That Publish Materials Science
  • Pages:401–418

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0012

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Chapter 4.4: History of the Brazilian MRS Meetings
  • Pages:419–430

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0013

Part V Regional Networks


Free Access
Part V: Regional Networks
  • Pages:431–432

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others05

No Access
Chapter 5.1: Building the Blocks of Sciences for Materials: Materials Science Institutions in Japan from a Historical Perspective
  • Pages:433–458

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0014

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Chapter 5.2: The Rise of Materials Science in China: Historical Aspects of Educational and Research Institutions
  • Pages:459–501

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0015

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Chapter 5.3: The Development of Materials Research Institutions in Africa
  • Pages:503–538

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0016

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Chapter 5.4: The Roots of Materials Science in Argentina: Jorge A. Sabato’s Multifaceted Metallurgy Project
  • Pages:539–562

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0017

Part VI Institutions of Institutions


Free Access
Part VI: Institutions of Institutions
  • Pages:563–564

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_others06

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Chapter 6.1: The Origin and Early Days of Material Research in Metrology Laboratories
  • Pages:565–579

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0018

No Access
Chapter 6.2: CERN: A Global Hub for Materials Science
  • Pages:581–653

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0019

No Access
Chapter 6.3: Will Small Be Beautiful? Making Policies for Our Nanotech Future
  • Pages:655–696

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811284342_0020

Robert P Crease is Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Stony Brook University. As a philosopher and historian of science, he has written extensively on the history of scientific institutions, especially in his writings on the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Professor Crease has also authored or co-authored 12 books, edited or translated 9 books, and published more than 250 articles, editorials or reviews. Other experiences include being the co-Editor-in-Chief of Physics in Perspective, and a regular contributor for more than 20 years on a column on Physics World, which has led him to be awarded the 2021 Lord Kelvin Prize. Additionally, Professor Crease is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Physics.