World Scientific
  • Search
  •   
Skip main navigation

Cookies Notification

We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. By continuing to browse the site, you consent to the use of our cookies. Learn More
×
Our website is made possible by displaying certain online content using javascript.
In order to view the full content, please disable your ad blocker or whitelist our website www.worldscientific.com.

System Upgrade on Tue, Oct 25th, 2022 at 2am (EDT)

Existing users will be able to log into the site and access content. However, E-commerce and registration of new users may not be available for up to 12 hours.
For online purchase, please visit us again. Contact us at [email protected] for any enquiries.
Retrotransposons and Human Disease cover

Thirty years ago we knew that retrotransposons made up at least half of our genomes, but little about their role in biology. The human genome has since been sequenced and the position of all retrotransposons in the reference sequence has been determined. However, as of today, the function of retrotransposons still remains elusive. We know much more about the diseases associated with their movement and the host defenses we all have against them.

This volume explores an array of diseases in humans associated with L1 retrotransposon movement within the human genome, including some cancers such as colon cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

The chapters explore the diversity of retrotransposons, their different biological mechanisms, the role of L1 in their movement, and their contribution to human diseases. This book posits that somatic events caused by retrotransposons have implications for mosaicism and are often associated with cancers. Germline events are common, occur quite early in development, and are a cause of single gene diseases. All in all, the authors implicate L1 retrotransposons as major sources of human diversity and advocate for their continued study.

Sample Chapter(s)
Preface
Chapter 5: Retrotransposition as a Cause of Human Disease: An Update

Contents:

  • Preface
  • The Diversity of Reverse Transcriptases (Blair G Paul, Irina A Yushenova, and Irina R Arkhipova)
  • Ty3 and Related LTR-Retrotransposon Reverse Transcriptases (Jennifer T Miller and Stuart F J Le Grice)
  • Experimental Systems for the Study of Non-LTR (LINE) Retrotransposons (Ivana Celic and Jeffrey S Han)
  • Alu Elements and Human Disease (Hanlin Yang, Maria E Morales, and Astrid M Roy-Engel)
  • Retrotransposition as a Cause of Human Disease: An Update (Haig H Kazazian)
  • LINE-1 Retrotransposons, Stem Cells, and Human Neurodevelopmental Disorders (Maria Benitez-Guijarro, Meriem Benkaddour-Boumzaouad, and Jose L Garcia-Perez)
  • Retrotransposition Mechanisms and Host Factors (Siew Loon Ooi, Kathleen H Burns, and Jef D Boeke)
  • Retrotransposons in the Mammalian Brain (Tracy A Bedrosian, Sara B Linker, and Fred H Gage)
  • LINE-1 Mobilization in Cancers: More the Rule than the Exception (Daniel Ardeljan and Kathleen H Burns)
  • Index

Readership: Researchers from both academia and industry, graduate students, premed students, clinicians.

Free Access
FRONT MATTER
  • Pages:i–xii

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_fmatter

No Access
Chapter 1: The Diversity of Reverse Transcriptases
  • Pages:1–28

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0001

No Access
Chapter 2: Ty3 and Related LTR-Retrotransposon Reverse Transcriptases
  • Pages:29–56

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0002

No Access
Chapter 3: Experimental Systems for the Study of Non-LTR (LINE) Retrotransposons
  • Pages:57–75

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0003

No Access
Chapter 4: Alu Elements and Human Disease
  • Pages:77–113

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0004

Free Access
Chapter 5: Retrotransposition as a Cause of Human Disease: An Update
  • Pages:115–127

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0005

No Access
Chapter 6: LINE-1 Retrotransposons, Stem Cells, and Human Neurodevelopmental Disorders
  • Pages:129–161

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0006

No Access
Chapter 7: Retrotransposition Mechanisms and Host Factors
  • Pages:163–198

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0007

No Access
Chapter 8: Retrotransposons in the Mammalian Brain
  • Pages:199–220

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0008

No Access
Chapter 9: LINE-1 Mobilization in Cancers: More the Rule than the Exception
  • Pages:221–243

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811249228_0009

Dr Abram Gabriel is currently an associate professor of molecular biology at Rutgers University. He has taught a section of a course on molecular pathways for over 20 years. His section deals with retrotransposons.