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Manufacturing in the Era of 4th Industrial Revolution cover

The era of the fourth industrial revolution is fundamentally transforming the manufacturing landscape. Products are getting increasingly complex and customers expect a higher level of customization and quality. Manufacturing in the Era of 4th Industrial Revolution explores three technologies that are the building blocks of the next-generation advanced manufacturing.

Volume 2 focuses on recent development in the area of industrial robotics and their applications in manufacturing.T raditionally, industrial robots have been used on mass production lines, where the same manufacturing operation is repeated many times. Recent advances in human-safe industrial robots present an opportunity for creating hybrid work cells, where humans and robots can collaborate in close physical proximities. This capability enables realizing systems that utilize the complementary strengths of humans and robots. Several new low-cost robots have been introduced in the market over the last few years, making them attractive in many new manufacturing applications where robot utilization is not expected to be very high. This makes the idea of hybrid cells economically viable for small volume production. At the same time, recent advances in artificial intelligence are striving to make industrial robots more agile, with the ability to adapt to changing environments and tasks. Additionally, recent advances in force and tactile sensing enable robots to be used on complex manufacturing tasks. These new capabilities are expanding the role of robotics in manufacturing operations and leading to significant growth in the industrial robotics area.

Contents:
  • About the Editors
  • About the Contributors
  • Introduction (Satyandra K Gupta, Venkat Krovi, and Craig Schlenoff)
  • Agile Industrial Robots (Craig Schlenoff, Zeid Kootbally, William Shackleford, Fred Proctor, Brian Antonishek, William Harrison, and Anthony Downs)
  • State-of-the-Art in Human-Robot Interaction (Jeremy A Marvel, Megan Zimmerman, and Shelly Bagchi)
  • Human-Robot Collaboration for Advanced Manufacturing by Learning from Multi-Modal Human Demonstrations (Weitian Wang, Yi Chen, Rui Li, Zhujun Zhang, Venkat Krovi and Yunyi Jia)
  • Collaborative Industrial Robot Control: From Safe Motion to Multi-Robot Manipulation (John T Wen, John Wason, Dan Kruse, Yuan-Chih Peng, and Shuyang Chen)
  • Blended Shared Control in Collaborative Robotics (Zongyao Jin and Prabhakar R Pagilla)
  • Learning and Coordination of Movement Primitives for Bimanual Manipulation Tasks Using Concurrent Synchronization (Ashwin Dani, Iman Salehi, Harish Ravichandar, and Gang Yao)
  • Advances in Robot Technology Supporting Low-Volume/High-Mix Small Part Assembly Operations (Joe Falco, Karl Van Wyk, and Kenny Kimble)
  • A Smart Companion Robot for Automotive Assembly (Jasprit Singh Gill, Yi Chen, Farbod Akhavan Niaki, Mark Tomaszewski, Weitian Wang, Laine Mears, Pierluigi Pisu, Yunyi Jia, and Venkat Krovi)
  • Collaborative Robotics for Deformable Object Manipulation with Use Cases from Food Processing Industry (Philip Long, Philippe Martinet, and Taskin Padir)
  • Collaborative Robots for Assembly of Large-Scale Structures (Ashis G Banerjee)
  • Robotic Finishing of Geometrically Complex Parts (Ariyan M Kabir, Prahar M Bhatt, Brual C Shah, and Satyandra K Gupta)
  • Advancing Capabilities of Industrial Robots Through Evaluation, Benchmarking, and Characterization (Adam Norton, Elena Messina, and Holly Yanco)
Readership: Individuals working with Additive Manufacturing in industry, government, and academia. Individuals working with design and materials who are interested in Additive Manufacturing; Universities that offer graduates course in robotics and automation, HCI in manufacturing, autonomous systems, virtual/augmented/mixed reality manufacturing, Industry 4.0.

Free Access
FRONT MATTER
  • Pages:i–xxxi

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_fmatter

No Access
Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Pages:1–6

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0001

No Access
Chapter 2: Agile Industrial Robots
  • Pages:7–42

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0002

No Access
Chapter 3: State-of-the-Art in Human-Robot Interaction
  • Pages:43–86

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0003

No Access
Chapter 4: Human-Robot Collaboration for Advanced Manufacturing by Learning from Multi-Modal Human Demonstrations
  • Pages:87–116

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0004

No Access
Chapter 5: Collaborative Industrial Robot Control: From Safe Motion to Multi-Robot Manipulation
  • Pages:117–152

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0005

No Access
Chapter 6: Blended Shared Control in Collaborative Robotics
  • Pages:153–186

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0006

No Access
Chapter 7: Learning and Coordination of Movement Primitives for Bimanual Manipulation Tasks Using Concurrent Synchronization
  • Pages:187–214

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0007

No Access
Chapter 8: Advances in Robot Technology Supporting Low-Volume/High-Mix Small Part Assembly Operations
  • Pages:215–238

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0008

No Access
Chapter 9: A Smart Companion Robot for Automotive Assembly
  • Pages:239–265

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0009

No Access
Chapter 10: Collaborative Robotics for Deformable Object Manipulation with Use Cases from Food Processing Industry
  • Pages:267–296

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0010

No Access
Chapter 11: Collaborative Robots for Assembly of Large-Scale Structures
  • Pages:297–313

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0011

No Access
Chapter 12: Robotic Finishing of Geometrically Complex Parts
  • Pages:315–336

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0012

No Access
Chapter 13: Advancing Capabilities of Industrial Robots Through Evaluation, Benchmarking, and Characterization
  • Pages:337–371

https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811222849_0013

Dr Satyandra K Gupta is Smith International Professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Department of Computer Science in Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California. He served as a program director for the National Robotics Initiative at the National Science Foundation from September 2012 to September 2014. Dr Gupta's interests are in the area of physics-aware decision making to facilitate and advance the state of automation. He has published more than 350 technical articles. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME). He serves as editor of the ASME Journal of Computing and Information Science in Engineering. Dr Gupta has received numerous honors and awards for his scholarly contributions. Representative examples include a Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research in 2000, Robert W Galvin Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers in 2001, CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2001, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2001, Invention of the Year Award at the University of Maryland in 2007, Kos Ishii-Toshiba Award from ASME in 2011, Excellence in Research Award from ASME Computers and Information in Engineering Division in 2013, and Distinguished Alumnus Award from Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee in 2014. He has also received ten best paper awards at international conferences.


Prof. Venkat N Krovi is currently the Michelin Endowed SmartState Chair Professor of Vehicle Automation at Clemson University — International Center for Automotive Research. His research focuses on intelligent modulation of distributed physical-power-interactions (motions/forces) between humans and autonomous-systems to unlock the "power of the many". Research activities focus on the life-cycle treatment (design, modeling, analysis, control, implementation and verification) of a new generation of systems for realizing Human-Autonomy synergy with applications in vehicle automation, plant-automation, and defense arenas. He currently serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and was the Founding Editor-in-Chief of the SAE Journal of Connected and Automated Vehicles. He has also taken significant leadership roles within multiple professional societies (ASME, IEEE) and currently serves on the Executive Committee of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society.


Dr Craig Schlenoff is the Group Leader of the Cognition and Collaboration Systems Group, the Associate Program Manager of the Measurement Science for Manufacturing Robotics Program, and the Project Leader of the Agility Performance of Robotic Systems project in the Intelligent Systems Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. His research interests include knowledge representation/ontologies, intention recognition, and performance evaluation of autonomous systems and industrial robotics. He has led multiple million-dollar projects addressing performance evaluation of advanced military technologies and agility performance of manufacturing robotic systems. He has published over 150 journal and conference papers, guest edited three journals, guest edited three books, and written four book chapters. He is currently the Associate Vice President for Standardization in the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society and the co-chair of the IEEE Robot Task Representation Working Group, was previously the chair of the IEEE Ontology for Robotics and Automation Working Group and has served as the Program Manager for the Process Engineering Program at NIST and the Director of Ontologies at VerticalNet. He also teaches two courses at the University of Maryland, College Park: "Calculus" and "Building a Manufacturing Robot Software System." He received his Bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, his Master's degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his PhD from the University of Burgundy (France).