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Special Issue on 14th Japan Earthquake Engineering Symposium Japan on 4-6 December 2014 (14 JEES); Guest Editor: Atsushi Nozu, (Port and Airport Research Institute, Japan)No Access

Rupture Process and Strong-Motion Generation of the 2014 Iquique, Northern Chile, Earthquake

    https://doi.org/10.1142/S179343111640008XCited by:4 (Source: Crossref)

    To investigate the rupture process and strong-motion generation of the MW 8.2 Iquique, Northern Chile, earthquake in 2014, we estimated kinematic source models from waveform inversion and back-projection analyses using strong-motion records. A slip model derived from the waveform inversion using the low-frequency (0.02–0.125Hz) velocities is characterized by a large slip area localized 50km south of the epicenter with a peak slip of 10m, and a deeper slip area with a peak slip above 2m located below the coast. The main rupture of these areas started 25s after the initial break generating two pronounced phases observed in most of the records. The landward slip area ruptured for about 10s generating the first impulsive phase, while the offshore largest slip area ruptured for 20s creating a longer duration phase observed later. Results from a back-projection analysis based on stacking of envelopes of 5–10-Hz accelerations indicate that the high-frequency radiation propagated down-dip towards the coast, reaching its maximum value from 25s to 40s, far away from the shallow main slip area obtained from low-frequency waveform inversion. Our results suggest a clear depth dependence of the seismic wave radiation during the Iquique earthquake.

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