World Scientific
  • Search
  •   
Skip main navigation

Cookies Notification

We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. By continuing to browse the site, you consent to the use of our cookies. Learn More
×
Our website is made possible by displaying certain online content using javascript.
In order to view the full content, please disable your ad blocker or whitelist our website www.worldscientific.com.

System Upgrade on Tue, Oct 25th, 2022 at 2am (EDT)

Existing users will be able to log into the site and access content. However, E-commerce and registration of new users may not be available for up to 12 hours.
For online purchase, please visit us again. Contact us at [email protected] for any enquiries.

THE TYNDALL COASTAL SIMULATOR AND INTERFACE

    https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814277426_0360Cited by:1 (Source: Crossref)
    Abstract:

    Coastal zones attract settlements, are ideal for a range of economic activities and accommodate important natural habitats that provide ecosystem services. All these coastal activities are vulnerable to climate and other changes unless appropriate management policies are implemented. Sea-level rise and intensified storms could increase the incidence of flooding and erosion, as well as degrade coastal ecosystems. Importantly, the coast is a linked system, and management responses for one area or sector may influence the impacts for other areas or sectors. Understanding coastal processes and taking account of climate and socio-economic futures helps to illustrate/reveal impending choices, and in developing responsive informed long-term coastal management policies. This paper describes research being carried out by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research on their Coastal Simulator. The research includes the linkage of a range of modelling procedures to represent coastal management and climate and coastal processes, as well as the design of a GIS-based interface to make the intergrated results accessible. The prototype simulator provides regional impact assessments of climate and socio-economic futures under various management options in the coastal zones of Norfolk, East Anglia and shows that erosion and flood risk are strongly linked.